Philips Lights Your Clothes

Philips Lights Your Clothes
Philips has developed a light-emitting textile called Lumalive. Beneath the outer fabric you will find a layered system containing flexible arrays of colored light-emitting diodes (LEDs), visible from the outside only when the display panel is switched on. This integration of electronic lighting devices into fabrics, according to Philips, signals an upcoming revolution in fashion.

Lumalive’s idea is to bring inert objects to life by integrating flexible arrays of multi-colored LEDs into fabrics without compromising the softness of the cloth. Clothing, towels, upholstery, and even drapes can all be illuminated by the new technology. Creating interaction between the digital textiles and their surroundings allows a wealth of new electronic applications.

Lumalive is modular and can be removed easily when you want to wash your garments or clean your soft furnishings. It can display lights in many colors,  to be accurate up to 16 million individual colors, and can even display text messages sent from a mobile phone.
According to Philips, the batteries of the Lumalive system are not visible and the technology requires very little power. Lumalive also has a playlist that can store your own bitmaps of dynamic images, scrolling text and moving logos.

TFOT recently covered several other innovative clothing technologies including the WarmX electric clothing, which includes tiny silver fibers woven into the knitted fabric and small rechargeable batteries to keep the body warm. A different invention comes in the form of the No-Contact Jacket, which includes a powerful but non-lethal 80,000 volt shocker. Last but not least are the “Good Vibrations” shoes which use electricity to make vibrations that are meant to improve the balance of older men.

More information about the Lumalive system can be found on the Lumalive website, or you can watch an explanatory movie.

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About the author

Guy Molho

Guy is an Industrial Engineering student at Tel Aviv University. He has experience in analysis of new technology, writing blogs and managing technological forums and communities.

View all articles by Guy Molho