The Future of Wi-Fi: Breaking the Frontier of Existing wireless Technology

Image result for wifi routers

 

THE NEED FOR SPEED

Internet usage has become an integral part of our lives, allowing us to work from home, watch streaming video, find our way around foreign spaces and keep in contact with far-flung friends and family. Just as well then that it has become cheaper, faster, more secure and more reliable. Around fifty percent of Internet users connect via Wi-Fi.

 

Until we are faced with slow data delivery, we seldom think about our Internet connections as our mobile devices move seamlessly between 3G and 4G connections and Wi-Fi.

 

Technological improvements aimed at speeding up data delivery are being driven by the increase in streaming video, and changes in the way that people demand and use information from the Internet and on social media platforms.

Face book reported at the beginning of 2016 that around eight billion videos were being viewed on its site per day. The use of wireless virtual reality headsets is growing, as is the use of downloaded music, movies and books. Online purchasing is also a growing trend and Wi-Fi both at home and in retail outlets enhance the experience. And this is just the start of our connectivity.

 

THE FUTURE LOOKS ROSY

 

COMPUTERISED HOUSES

The future belongs to the Internet of Things. Our homes and workplaces are becoming increasingly connected, as appliances, lights, heating and cooling, security systems and cameras are fitted with sensors, processors and communication devices. Despite some concerns about the security of data in these systems, by 2020 it is estimated that there will be thirty billion connected devices. As things stand today, establishing wireless connectivity across several household devices is possible with a smart and modern wireless router. Checkout out these modern Wi-Fi routers from Check Corner and create a strong and seamless wifi network for your home

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The IoT connects physical objects with the available computer network. The technology is widespread including Smart Homes, Smart grids and intelligent transport systems. Smart home technology is still very new but already there are devices that allow the homeowner to manage, heating, lighting and even appliances from their smart phones.

 

ENERGISING SMART GADGETS

Smart technology requires an energy source, and fortunately the technology required to charge your gadgets wirelessly already exists. It will not be long before all small devices in the home are totally wireless, charged through radio frequency using Wi-Fi, television or cell phones. This technology works by transmitting weak radio signals, powering up low energy household and wearable devices. Passive Wi-Fi devices have few components so they should be inexpensive and easy to install.

 

 

SELF DRIVEN VEHICLES

Wi-Fi is set to become as common in motor vehicles as Blue tooth. WiFi technology allows for easier integration with smart phones, as screen projection technologies make it possible for drivers to make a smooth transition from cell phone to motor vehicle.

 

The car of the future will access the Cloud to check your calendar, the traffic and the weather using the information to tailor your trip to your individual needs. The radio frequency technology used allows for easily installed advanced navigation features, and signals from on road and roadside connections. Communication is a key requirement for the introduction of self-driven cars. Vehicle to vehicle links allow the vehicle to signal intentions to other road users via wireless technology, and passengers can access the Internet using the vehicle’s Wi-Fi hotspot.

 

DATA DELIVERY SPEEDING UP FOR THE FUTURE

With so many exciting future prospects all requiring radio frequency technology, it is little wonder that the scientific community are actively seeking more innovative ways to speed up and secure internet access, and all this activity is paying dividends.

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INFRA RED RAYS – SUPER QUICK INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Scientists from the Netherlands have developed new Wi-Fi technology using infrared rays, and they claim that it is one hundred times faster than current technology. Its capacity is more than forty Gigabits per second. Every device is provided with its own ray of light, so data is not shared. The technology is inexpensive and installation is easy. An antenna that provides infrared rays to the user provides the data pathway. The network tracks the location of devices via their radio signals.

 

LI-FI – USING THE FLICKER OF THE LED LIGHT FOR PRIVATE SECURE INFORMATION

Li-Fi, uses the visible light spectrum to transmit data and it may be the answer to  Wi-Fi congestion. Li-Fi uses the flickering of LED lights to transmit data. It is capable of transmitting data at 224 Gigabits per second. It cannot pass through walls so it is likely that Li-Fi will be used in conjunction with Wi-Fi, and will be targeted on specific users.

 

Because it is localised Li-Fi is considered more private and secure than Wi-Fi. Where Wi-Fi is not available, Li-Fi may just be the answer. To pick it up the signal you simply plug in a dongle. Accessing Li-Fi should be cheap as the visible light spectrum is free. Up to the sixty percent of the global population who have no access to the Internet, may be able to connect via Li-Fi.

 

INCREASED DATA DELIVERY IN PUBLIC AREAS

The Massachusetts School of Technology recently announced that they had made a breakthrough in Wi-Fi technology, producing new technology that is 330 times faster and twice the bandwidth. MegaMIMO 2.0 has multiple transmitters and receivers that simultaneously transmit data. This could increase the speed of data transmission in public areas.

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SUPER WIFI – TRANSMITTING INTO UNSERVICED AREAS

Already available in some rural areas, Super Wi-Fi is transmitted over the same airwaves used by television broadcasters. Wi-Fi signals sent via TV band travel much further than current Wi-Fi or broadband signals. The TV band is regulated and so there is no interference with the signal from other household devices. The signals will be transmitted via the white spectrum in the television band, so that those living in out of the way rural spaces will have access to Wi-Fi.

 

CONCLUSION

The scope and speed of data transfer technologies will continue to improve as industry seeks to find innovative ways to keep the population connected. Sixty percent of the global population still has no access to the Internet, limiting their commercial and educational prospects.

 

Screen projection technologies, driverless cars, streaming television, Smart factories and homes all require radio frequency technology. Wi-Fi connections will enable these technologies, setting new challenges for the next generation of wireless creations.