World’s Thinnest Mouse

World’s Thinnest Mouse
Prefer to use a mouse with your laptop but don’t want to carry accessories? The MoGo Bluetooth Mouse BT and X54T models developed by Newton Peripherals is a simple, yet ingenious solution. This 5 mm (0.2 in.) thick, wireless mouse the size of a business card weighs only 14 g (0.5 oz.), but the main attraction is the convenient storage inside the PC Card slot located on the side of most laptops. Recently laptops started using a new ExpressCard/X54 slot and Newton Peripherals developed a new X54 version of its MoGo Mouse to fit this standard.

Both models use Bluetooth 2.0 wireless communications and are based on an 800 dpi optical sensor. MoGo has a kickstand to prop it up at an angle – mimicking the feel of a traditional mouse, deep finger depressions, two (or, in the case of the X54T version, three) clickable buttons, auto-on functionality when it ejects from the card slot, and an underside on/off switch. A small touchpad on the MoGo X54T model functions as an integrated scrolling wheel replacement. 

The MoGo Mouse’s 90 mAh battery is recharged inside the card slot and seems to be enough for most users since the mouse has an intelligent power-saving technology that turns the mouse off if not used for several minutes. A simple click reconnects it.  

The BT and X54T versions run $70 and $80, respectively. For laptops that don’t include Bluetooth support, a tiny BT adapter is also available for $50. The MoGo X54T version will become available in Q2 of 2007. 

More information on the MoGo Mouse on the Newton Peripherals website.
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About the author

Iddo Genuth

Iddo has a B.A. in Philosophy and Cognitive Science and an M.A. in Philosophy of Science from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is currently writing his Ph.D. thesis on the relationship between the scientific community and industry. Iddo was awarded the 2006 Bar Hillel philosophy of science prize for his work on the relationship between science and technology. He is a member of the board of the lifeboat foundation and was the editor of several high-profile science and technology websites since 1999.

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