FIT T-shirt Will Monitor your Health Wirelessly

FIT T-shirt Will Monitor your Health Wirelessly

FIT medical sensing shirt (Credit: Maxim Integrated)
California based company Maxim Integrated recently announced a model for a vital signs monitoring shirt. The T-shirt is able to measures 3-lead ECG, body temperature, and motion and report record this information wirelessly to a patient’s Smartphone application or directly to the physician.
Preventive medical care has been neglected for years – either because of lack of awareness among medical professionals, lack of will by medical manufacturers or simply lack of adequate technology that will enable ordinary people to monitor their day-to-day activity in a non-invasive, simple and cheap way.
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However in recent years increasing awareness among medical stuff, improved dry sensors that can monitor various vital signs without the need for skin preparation and gels, as well as improved low power wireless technology and the growing prevalence of mobile applications (and medical applications in particular) all seem to contribute to a surge in preventive medical technology development.
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Fit is a special shirt developed by Maxim Integrated in collaboration with two other companies: Clearbridge VitalSigns and Orbital Research. the FIT is capable of monitoring vital signs including Electrocardiography (ECG), body temperature and motion using complex signal processing technology an ultra-low-power microcontroller and low power and wireless electronics.
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FIT is said to be a reference design intended to allow other manufacturers (both medical device manufacturers and advanced sports and lifestyle ones to create their own unique versions of the FIT with specific applications and capabilities.
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More information about FIT can be found on the Maxim Integrated website (and here).
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TFOT covered other garment related technologies recently including a T-shirt that can be used as a ultra powerful flexible battery but still retain all the normal properties of a conventional shirt developed by researchers from the University of South Carolina.
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About the author

Iddo Genuth

Iddo has a B.A. in Philosophy and Cognitive Science and an M.A. in Philosophy of Science from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is currently writing his Ph.D. thesis on the relationship between the scientific community and industry. Iddo was awarded the 2006 Bar Hillel philosophy of science prize for his work on the relationship between science and technology. He is a member of the board of the lifeboat foundation and was the editor of several high-profile science and technology websites since 1999.

View all articles by Iddo Genuth